Animal Farm-quotes on Squealer Flashcard Example #97410

How he is described
“The best known among them (the porkers) was a small fat pig named Squealer, with very round cheeks, twinkling eyes, nimble movements, and a shrill voice.” (Page 9)
How he is described
“He was a brilliant talker, and when he was arguing some difficult point he had a way of skipping from side to side and whisking his tail which was somehow very persuasive.” (Page 9)
How he is described
“The others said of Squealer that he could turn black into white.” (Page 9)
What opinions and views he holds
“‘Comrades!’ he (Squealer) cried. ‘You do not imagine, I hope, that we pigs are doing this in a spirit of selfishness and privilege? Many of us actually dislike milk and apples. I dislike them myself. Our sole object in taking these things is to preserve our health. Milk and apples (this has been proved by Science, comrades) contain substances absolutely necessary to the well-being of a pig. We pigs are brain-workers. The whole management and organization of this farm depend on us. Day and night we are watching over your welfare. It is for your sake that we drink that milk and eat those apples.'” (Page 22)
What opinions and views he has
“In his speeches, Squealer would talk with the tears rolling down his cheeks of Napoelon’s wisdom, the goodness of his heart, and the deep love he bore to all animals everywhere, even and especially the unhappy animals who still lived in ignorance and slavery on other farms.” (Page 58)
What his relationships with other characters are like
“That evening Squealer explained privately to the other animals that Napoleon had never in reality been opposed to the windmill. On the contrary, it was he who had advocated it in the beginning, and the plan which Snowball had drawn on the floor of the incubator shed had actually been stolen from among Napoleon’s papers. The windmill was, in fact, Napoleon’s own creation. Why then, asked somebody, had he spoken so strongly against it? Here Squealer looked very sly. That, he said, was Comrade Napoleon’s cunning. He had seemed to oppose the windmill, simply as a manoeuvre to get rid of Snowball, who was a dangerous character and a bad influence. Now that Snowball was out of the way, the plan could go forward without his interference. This, said Squealer was something called tactics. He repeated it a number of times, ‘Tactics comrades, tactics!’ skipping round and whisking his tail with a merry laugh. The animals were not certain what the word meant, but Squealer spoke so persuasively, and the three dogs who happened to be with him growled so threateningly, that they accepted his explanation without further questions. “(Page 36-37)
What his relationships with other characters are like
“…in comparison with the days of Jones, the improvement was enormous. Reading out the figures in a shrill, rapid voice…the animals believed every word of it…besides, in those days they had been slaves and now they were free, and that made all the difference, as Squealer did not fail to point out.” (Page 70)
The role he plays on the farm
“Afterwards Squealer made a round of the farm and set the animals’ minds at rest. He assured them that the resolution against engaging in trade and using money had never been passed, or even suggested.” (Page 40)
The role he plays on the farm
“All orders were now issued through Squealer or one of the other pigs.” (Page 57)
The contextual significance he has
“As they approached the farm Squealer, who had unaccountably been absent during the fighting, came skipping towards them, whisking his tail and beaming with satisfaction. And the animals heard, from the direction of the farm buildings, the solemn booming of a gun.” (Page, 66)
The contextual significance he has
“About this time there occurred a strange incident which hardly anyone was able to understand. One night at about twelve o’clock there was a loud crash in the yard, and the animals rushed out of their stalls. It was a moonlight night. At the foot of the end wall of the big barn, where the Seven Commandments were written, there lay a ladder broken in two pieces. Squealer, temporarily stunned, was sprawling beside it, and near at hand there lay a lantern, a paint-brush, and an overturned pot of white paint. The dogs immediately made a ring round Squealer, and escorted him back to the farmhouse as soon as he was able to walk. None of the animals could form any idea as to what this meant, except old Benjamin, who nodded his muzzle with a knowing air, and seemed to understand, but would say nothing.” (Page 68)
The contextual significance he has
“…in comparison with the days of Jones, the improvement was enormous. Reading out the figures in a shrill, rapid voice…the animals believed every word of it…besides, in those days they had been slaves and now they were free, and that made all the difference, as Squealer did not fail to point out.” (Page 70)
The contextual significance he has
“Here Squealer’s demeanour suddenly changed. He fell silent for a moment, and his little eyes, darted suspicious glances from side to side before he proceeded.” (Page 78)
The contextual significance he has
“…all the animals broke into a gallop and rushed into the yard. Then they saw what Clover had seen. Yes, it was Squealer. A little awkwardly, as though not quite used to supporting his considerable bulk in that position, but with perfect balance, he was strolling across the yard.
The importance he has to the story
(REPEATED) “He was a brilliant talker, and when he was arguing some difficult point he had a way of skipping from side to side and whisking his tail which was somehow very persuasive.” (Page 9)
The importance he has to the story
(REPEATED) “The others said of Squealer that he could turn black into white.” (Page 9)
The importance he has to the story
(REPEATED) “All orders were now issued through Squealer or one of the other pigs.” (Page 57)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *