Fitzgerald and The Roaring Twenties Flashcard Example #17417

Read the excerpt from The Great Gatsby.

For a moment the last sunshine fell with romantic affection upon her glowing face; her voice compelled me forward breathlessly as I listened—then the glow faded, each light deserting her with lingering regret, like children leaving a pleasant street at dusk.

Based on this excerpt, what inference can be made about Daisy Buchanan?

Her beauty is matched by her intellect.

She values independence more than anything.

Her beauty and ease mask a darker reality.

She is a women of few demands

C. Her beauty and ease mask a darker reality.
Read the excerpt from Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby.

The practical thing was to find rooms in the city, but it was a warm season, and I had just left a country of wide lawns and friendly trees, so when a young man at the office suggested that we take a house together in a commuting town, it sounded like a great idea. He found the house, a weather-beaten cardboard bungalow at eighty a month.

Nick’s recent arrival at West Egg and his intention to stay for only a short time underscore the fact that

he is not as wealthy as his counterparts.

he has just returned from the war.

he is being supported by his family.

he is an outsider in this community.

D. He is an outsider in this community
The location of Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby is important because

it emphasizes the decadence of the 1920s.

it appeals to most readers of the novel.

it underscores the main points of the plot.

it is as complicated as the main characters.

A. It emphasizes the decadence of the 1920’s
Which excerpt from The Great Gatsby is the best example of foreshadowing?

. . . he stretched out his arms toward the dark water in a curious way, and, far as I was from him, I could have sworn he was trembling. Involuntarily I glanced seaward — and distinguished nothing except a single green light, minute and far away, that might have been the end of a dock. When I looked once more for Gatsby he had vanished, and I was alone again in the unquiet darkness.

Of course I knew what they were referring to, but I wasn’t even vaguely engaged. The fact that gossip had published the banns was one of the reasons I had come East. You can’t stop going with an old friend on account of rumors, and on the other hand I had no intention of being rumored into marriage.

I said lightly that I had heard nothing at all, and a few minutes later I got up to go home. They came to the door with me and stood side by side in a cheerful square of light. As I started my motor Daisy peremptorily called: “Wait!”

“Her family is one aunt about a thousand years old. Besides, Nick’s going to look after her, aren’t you, Nick? She’s going to spend lots of week-ends out here this summer. I think the home influence will be very good for her.”

A. . he stretched out his arms toward the dark water in a curious way, and, far as I was from him, I could have sworn he was trembling. Involuntarily I glanced seaward — and distinguished nothing except a single green light, minute and far away, that might have been the end of a dock. When I looked once more for Gatsby he had vanished, and I was alone again in the unquiet darkness.
Read the excerpt from The Great Gatsby.

“But we heard it,” insisted Daisy, surprising me by opening up again in a flower-like way. “We heard it from three people, so it must be true.”

Of course I knew what they were referring to, but I wasn’t even vaguely engaged. The fact that gossip had published the banns was one of the reasons I had come East. You can’t stop going with an old friend on account of rumors, and on the other hand I had no intention of being rumored into marriage.

Daisy’s insistence that the rumor of Nick’s engagement is true despite his denial suggests a conflict between

East Egg and West Egg.

the upper class and the middle class.

Jay Gatsby and Tom Buchanan.

rumor and reality.

D. Rumor and Reality
Read the excerpt from The Great Gatsby.

My own house was an eyesore, but it was a small eyesore, and it had been overlooked, so I had a view of the water, a partial view of my neighbor’s lawn, and the consoling proximity of millionaires—all for eighty dollars a month.

Across the courtesy bay the white palaces of fashionable East Egg glittered along the water, and the history of the summer really begins on the evening I drove over there.

What message do phrases such as “the consoling proximity of millionaires” and “white palaces of fashionable East Egg glittered” convey to the reader?

Everyone in East Egg lives in a palace.

Financial wealth is desirable to the narrator.

The narrator despises people who live in large homes.

Financial wealth has no relevance in this novel.

B. Financial Wealth is desirable to the narrator
Read the excerpt from Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby.

Their house was even more elaborate than I expected, a cheerful red-and-white Georgian Colonial mansion, overlooking the bay. The lawn started at the beach and ran toward the front door for a quarter of a mile, jumping over sun-dials and brick walks and burning gardens—finally when it reached the house drifting up the side in bright vines as though from the momentum of its run. The front was broken by a line of French windows, glowing now with reflected gold and wide open to the warm windy afternoon, and Tom Buchanan in riding clothes was standing with his legs apart on the front porch.

Based on this description of the Buchanans’ house, what inference can be made about many East Egg residents?

They hide their unattractive qualities beneath beautiful, light, and dreamy appearances.

They commonly ride horses in the afternoon or early evening hours.

They are more sophisticated than West Egg residents, because they have less money.

They place more importance on the appearance of their homes than in anything else.

A. They hide their unattractive qualities beneath beautiful, light, and dreamy appearances
Read the excerpt from The Great Gatsby.

I lived at West Egg, the—well, the less fashionable of the two, though this is a most superficial tag to express the bizarre and not a little sinister contrast between them.

The phrase, “I lived at West Egg, the—well, the less fashionable of the two” reveals

the narrator’s upper-middle-class, socioeconomic standing.

the narrator’s awareness of social judgments and their central role in the novel.

the narrator’s deep desire to fit in and be friends with the fashionable crowd.

the narrator’s insecurities as he befriends a new group of individuals.

B. The narrator’s awareness of social judgements and their central role in the novel
Read the excerpt from Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby.

I lived at West Egg, the—well, the less fashionable of the two, though this is a most superficial tag to express the bizarre and not a little sinister contrast between them. . . . Across the courtesy bay the white palaces of fashionable East Egg glittered along the water, and the history of the summer really begins on the evening I drove over there to have dinner with the Tom Buchanans.

Based on these descriptions, what inference can be made about the difference between West Egg and East Egg?

The wealthy residents of East Egg hide their unattractive qualities beneath light and dreamy appearances.

Because the residents of West Egg have only recently earned their money, they are more sophisticated.

West Egg is less fashionable because its residents have much less money than the residents of East Egg.

The residents of West Egg and East Egg are noticeably different from one another, but they often socialize together.

A. The wealthy residents of East Egg hide their unattractive qualities beneath light and dreamy appearances
Read the excerpt from Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby.

My own house was an eyesore, but it was a small eyesore, and it had been overlooked, so I had a view of the water, a partial view of my neighbor’s lawn, and the consoling proximity of millionaires—all for eighty dollars a month.

Across the courtesy bay the white palaces of fashionable East Egg glittered along the water, and the history of the summer really begins on the evening I drove over there.

The contrast created between East Egg and West Egg suggests that

the main character feels comfortable in all social situations.

Nick will experience a series of financial pitfalls as the story unfolds.

the story’s conflict will be based on wealth and appearances.

the story will be presented from a number of differing perspectives.

C. The story’s conflict will be based on wealth and appearances

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