Frankenstein critical readings Flashcard Example #3443

Suzanna storment
He understands the power he possesses; yet acts anyway… Victor creates life because of his own greed, and the monster haunts him to the end because of it.
Joseph kestner
Fearing sexual contact Frankenstein wanted the female dead.
Joseph kestner
Frankenstein is not simply a re-working of Milton’s creation myth, but an implicit critique of that ideology.
Joseph kestner
Perhaps frankenstein is not merely the modern Prometheus, but the modern narcissus.
Percy bysshe Shelley
Treat a person I’ll, and he will become wicked.
Anne k Mellor
Nature both resists and revenges herself upon his attempts.
Anne k Mellor
The novel is “critiquing male attitudes to female sexuality”.
Anne k Mellor
The novel criticises victor’s (and therefore other men’s) fear of female desire.
Anne k Mellor
Suggests there is “a homoerotic edge to frankenstein.”
Anne k Mellor
Elizabeth is destroyed by Shelley for adhering too closely to a model of propriety.
Anne k Mellor
Frankenstein substitutes paternal propagation for sexual reproduction.
Anne k Mellor
The engagement of science deplore by Shelley was… The notion that science should manipulate and control rather than describe, understand and revere nature.
Anne k Mellor
Suggests frankenstein wants to “eliminate the female as he attempts to win eternal fame as the founder of a new line of superhumans.”
Harold bloom
Despite his crimes, the creature is as much angel as he is monster.
Harold bloom
The daemon is superior to his maker in both spirit and feeling.
Harold bloom
Victor Frankenstein is nothing less than a moral idiot.
Harold bloom
Victor Frankenstein is a father and a god who has failed to love his marred creation.
Harold bloom
The novel’s greatest strength seems to me it contrast between the deepening of self-consciousness in the poor daemon and the narrowing of self-awareness in victor frankenstein.
Gilbert ; Gubar
Shelley’s monster is as nameless as a woman in a patriarchal society. As nameless as unmarried, illegitimately pregnant Mary wollestonecraft Shelley May have felt herself to be at the time she wrote frankenstein.
Ellen moers
The novel is “a horror story of maternity”
Ellen moers
Pregnant at sixteen, and almost constantly pregnant throughout the following five years…at the age of eighteen Mary Godwin began to write frankenstein. So are monsters born.
Ellen moers
The novel’s emphasis is not on “birth” but “after-birth”
Anne k Mellor
By stealing the female’a control over reproduction, frankenstein has eliminated the females primary biological function and source of cultural power.
Stephen vine
Argues victor destroys the ‘monsteress’ because he is frightened of the ideas of female independence, sadism, desire, power and monstrosity.
Fred v Randall
Argues frankensteins workshop can be equated to the female reproductive system-yet it is described as disgusting, perhaps reflecting Shelley’s bad experiences with birth.
Fred v Randall
To frankenstein, mountains are almighty and powerful like god. They are paternal.
Mary A Favret
We must begin to read frankenstein more as a well-wrought ‘baggy monster’ I correspondences, and less as a singular, alien phenomenon.
Mary A Favret
Is the monster’s tale only a demonic projection of Frankenstein’s tortured psyche?
Criscillia Benford
Structure of Frankenstein “often likened to Russian nesting dolls”
Prof. Mike Rossington
Think of Frankenstein as an analysis of the dangers attendant on an exclusively intellectual approach to society.
Rebecca Wilson
(Victor) commits possibly the most horrific violation of nature in all of Gothic literature, by trying to imitate God.
Andrew graham-Dixon
The bare bones of scientific enquiry are not enough, they have to be animated by the spirit of moral responsibility.
Anne k Mellor
Mary Shelley doubted the legitimacy of her own literary voice, a doubt that determines her decision to speak through three male narrators.
Jane blumberg
Argues that the fact that paradise lost has such an important role in the text implies support for revolutionary activity
Dr. siv jansson
The novels use of the myth of Prometheus as an analogy got victor Frankenstein also supports an ‘anti-authoritarian’ reading
Paul O’flinn
Sees mary Shelley’s politics as “shaped by a passion for reform” but also a “nervousness about the chance of…revolutionary violence”
Lee sterrenburg
The novel “surreptitiously criticises Godwin in personal and autobiographical terms”
Mark jancovich
The novel is concerned that subjective experience and domestic affection should not be separated from, and defined as irrelevant to, scientific activities.

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