Hamlet part 2: Word choice and tone Flashcard Example #55620

Read the passage from Hamlet, Act I, Scene iii.

Polonius: Costly thy habit as thy purse can buy,
But not express’d in fancy; rich, not gaudy;
For the apparel oft proclaims the man,
And they in France of the best rank and station
Are most select and generous, chief in that.

attire
Read the passage from Hamlet, Act I, Scene iii.

Laertes: Then weigh what loss your honour may sustain,
If with too credent ear you list his songs,
Or lose your heart …

believing
To analyze tone, which things should the reader study? Check all that apply.
connotations, diction, the speaker, the topic
Read the passage from Hamlet, Act I, Scene v.

Ophelia: And, with his other hand thus o’er his brow,
He falls to such perusal of my face
As he would draw it. Long stay’d he so;
At last, a little shaking of mine arm,
And thrice his head thus waving up and down,
He rais’d a sigh so piteous and profound
That it did seem to shatter all his bulk
And end his being.

perusal
Read the passage from Hamlet, Act I, Scene v.

Hamlet: Remember thee!
Ay, thou poor ghost, while memory holds a seat
In this distracted globe.

head
Read the passage from Hamlet, Act II, Scene i.

Polonius: How now, Ophelia! what’s the matter?
Ophelia: Alas! my lord, I have been so affrighted.
Polonius: With what, in the name of God?
Ophelia: My lord, as I was sewing in my closet,
Lord Hamlet, with his doublet all unbrac’d;
No hat upon his head; his stockings foul’d …

affrighted
The attitude of a text toward the subject being discussed is called
tone
Read the passage from Hamlet, Act I, Scene v.

Ghost: I could a tale unfold whose lightest word
Would harrow up thy soul, freeze thy young blood,
Make thy two eyes, like stars, start from their spheres,
Thy knotted and combined locks to part,
And each particular hair to stand an end …

greatly disturb
What is nuance?
a small or subtle difference in meaning
Read the passage from Hamlet, Act I, Scene iii.

Hamlet: My fate cries out,
And makes each petty artery in this body
As hardy as the Nemean lion’s nerve. GHOST beckons.
Still am I call’d. Unhand me, gentlemen, Breaking from them.
By heaven! I’ll make a ghost of him that lets me:
I say, away! Go on, I’ll follow thee. Exeunt GHOST and HAMLET.

unhand me, gentlemen

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *