Jane Eyre Love quotes Flashcard Example #11695

Jane Eyre
“While I breathe and think, I must love him.”
Jane Eyre
“I had learnt to love Mr Rochester: I could not unlove him now.”
Jane Eyre
“Wherever you are is my home-my only home.”
Rochester
“Gathering me to his breast, pressing his lips on my lips: “so, Jane.”
Rochester
“I sometimes have a queer feeling with regard to you-especially when you are near me, as now: it is as if I had a string somewhere inder my left ribs, tightly and inextricably knotted to a similar string situated in the corresponding quarter of your little frame.”
Rochester
“I summon you as my wife: it is you only I intend to marry.”
Jane Eyre
“He stood between me and every thought of religion, as an eclipse intervenes between man ans the broad sun I could not, in those days, see God for His creature: of whom I had more an idol.”
Jane Eyre (about Rosamund Oliver, St. John)
“He would not give one chance of heaven nor relinquish, for the elysium of her love, one hope of the true, eternal Paradise.”
Jane Eyre
“I took that dear hand, held ot a moment to my lips.”
Jane Eyre
“Reader I married him.”
Jane Eyre
“He made me love him without even looking at me.”
Rochester
“Good-night, my-” He stopped, bit his lip, and abruptly left me.”
Jane Eyre (About Helen Burns)
“I felt as if I could not let her go”
Jane Eyre (About Aunt Read)
“Love me, then, or hate me, as you will” I said at last “You have my full and free forgiveness.”
John Read (ch1)
“…you are a dependent…”
Miss Abbot (ch2)
“It is your place to be humble”
Bessie (ch2)
“If you don’t sit still, you must be tied down.”
Helen (ch6)
“Yet it would be your duty to bear it, if you could not avoid it: it is weak and silly to say you cannot bear what it is your fate to be required to bear.”
Jane (ch9)
“I must see Helen, – I must embrace her before she died, – I must give her one last kiss, exchange with her one last word.”
Jane (ch9)
“I will stay with you, dear Helen: no one shall take me away.”
Jane (ch12)
“…women feel just as men feel.”
Jane (ch12)
“He laid a heavy hand on my shoulder, and leaning on me with some stress, limped to his horse”.
Jane (ch14)
“I have a right to get pleasure out of life: and I will get it, cost what it may.”
Jane (ch17)
“…my eyes were drawn involuntarily to his face; I could not keep their lids under control.”
Jane (ch17)
“He made me love him without looking at me.”
Jane (ch17)
“I must, then, repeat continually that we are for ever sundered: – and yet, while I breathe and think, I must love him.”
Jane (ch18)
“struggle with two tigers – jealousy and despair”
Jane (ch23)
“Do you think, because I am poor, obscure, plain, and little, I am soulless and heartless? You think wrong! – I have as much soul as you, – and full as much heart!”
Jane (ch23)
” – it is my spirit that addresses your spirit; just as if both had passed through the grave, and we stood at God’s feet, equal, – as we are!”
Rochester (ch23)
“I offer you my hand, my heart, and a share of all my possessions.”
Rochester (ch23)
” ‘My bride is here,’ he said, again drawing me to him, ‘because my equal is here, and likeness. Jane, will you marry me?’ “
Rochester (ch23)
“You – you strange, you almost unearthly thing! – I love as my own flesh.”
Rochester (ch23)
“…I must have you for my own… Will you be mine? Say yes, quickly.”
Jane (ch24)
“I loved him very much – more that I could trust myself to say – more than words had power to express.”
Jane
“I could not, in those days, see God for His creature: of whom I had made an idol.”
Rochesters terms of endeerment
“Janet”; “little wife”; “little elf”; “my mustard-seed”;
Jane (ch26)
“Jane Eyre, who had been an ardent, expectant woman-almost a bride-was a cold solitary girl again.”
Jane (ch27)
“Terrible moment: full of struggle, blackness, burning! Not a human being that ever lived could wish to be loved better than I was loved: and him who thus loved me I absolutely worshipped: and I must renounce love and idol.”
Rochester (ch27)
‘Oh, Jane! my hope – my love – my life!’ broke in anguish from his lips.
Jane and the moon (pretend convo) (ch27)
‘My daughter, flee temptation’. ‘Mother, I will.’
Jane (ch27)
“I do not want to leave him – I cannot leave him.
Jane (ch33)
“Marry! I don’t want to marry, and never shall marry.”
Jane (ch33)
“No one would take me for love”
St.John (ch34)
“…you are formed for labour, not for love. A missionary’s wife you must – shall be. You shall be mine: I claim you – not for my pleasure, but for my Sovereign’s service.”
St.John (ch34)
“I wish to mate: it is the missionary.”
Jane (ch35)
“…undoubtedly enough of love would follow upon marriage to render the union right even in your eyes.”
Jane (ch35)
“I scorn your idea of love”/ “the very name of love is an apple of discord between us.”
Jane (ch35)
“It was my time to assume ascendancy. My powers were in play and force.”
Jane (ch35)
“Reader, do you know, as I do, what terror those cold people can put into the ice of their questions?”
Jane (ch29) (This quotation represents the theme of society and its values. Jane is insistent on showing Rochester that just because she is poor and has no influence in society, it doesn’t mean that she is not a human being with feelings.)
“Some of the best people that ever lived have been as destitute as I am; and if you are a Christian, you ought not to consider poverty a crime.”
Jane (This quotation represents the theme of society and its values. Jane is insistent on showing Rochester that just because she is poor and has no influence in society, it doesn’t mean that she is not a human being with feelings.)
“Do you think, because I am poor, obscure, plain and little, I am soulless and heartless?”
Rochester
“Every atom of your flesh is as dear to me as my own: in pain and sickness it would still be dear.”
Jane
“Gentle reader, may you never feel what I then felt! May your eyes never shed such stormy, scalding, heart-wrung tears as poured from mine. May you never appeal to Heaven in prayers so hopeless and so agised as in that hour left my lips: for never may you, like me, dread to be the instrument of evil to what you wholly love.”
Jane
“I had not intended to love him; the reader knows I had wrought hard to extirpate from my soul the germs of love there detected;”
When Jane is being bound to a chair ch2
“A mad cat”
Visual comtrasts
“Folds of scarlet drapery” and “drear November day”
The control of men
John Reed says he owns the books in which jane reads “will do in a few years” – Symbolically suggests that even though a women may understand what is written, conventionally it is the boy who woll geow ip to be the heir in control oh hpusehold documents, wills and deeds.
Bessie on Jane in ch3
“Poor orphan child”
Miss Abbot on Jane
“If she were a nice, pretty child” – Implying she would be pitied if she was visually pleasing
Bessie on jane
“A beauty like Miss Georgiana would be more moving in tbe same condition” – Implies successful femininity requires good looks.
Mr Brocklehurst as the big bad wolf
“What a great nose! and what a mouth! and what large prominent teeth!” – Reflects the influence of Bessies stories in Jane and the implication is also that Mr Brocklehurst is a liar.
Miss Temple
Her first name is Maria. This is derived from Mary (Christ’s mother) and the name of Bronte’s eldest sister.
Description of Miss Temple
“The door opened, and an individual carrying a light entered; … a tall lady with dark hair, dark eyes, and a pale and large forehead; her figure was partly enveloped in a shawl, he countenance was grave,her bearng erect”
Lowoods methods
“little beds… assigned as gardens for the pupils to cultivate” – Based on Victorian idea that through gardening children might themselves become cultivated eg. good and moral. Also suggests that nature should and will be tamed.
Miss Scatcherd
“You dirty, disagreeable girl! You have never cleaned your nails this morning!”
Jane is doubtful about the validity of Helen’s example
“in the tranquillity she imparted there was an alloy of inexpressible sadness” – Helens faith makes her turn away from her life.
Helen an Jane’s Alter Ego
“Her grave… for fifteen years… was only covered by a grassy mound; but noe a gray marble tablet marks the spot, inscribed with her name, and the word ‘Resurgam (means I shall rise again)'”
Chapter 10 discussion of form
“this is not to be a regular autobiography” – in order to explain that 8 years have passed and Her childhood is wrapped up
Janes strength
“I desired liberty; for liberty I gasped; for liberty I uttered a prayer”
Bessies observation
“You are genteel enough; you look like a lady, and it is as much I ever expected of you: you were no beauty as a child.”
Thornfield
“array of mighty old thorn trees, strong, knotty, and broad as oaks”
Jane becomes a governess
“Inexperienced youth” ; “A new chapter in a novel”
When R + J meet he says
“necessity compels me to make you useful”
Fire and Ice
Thornfield is ice before R returns and Jane says she is “becoming incapable of appreciating” the “very privileges of security and ease” – Under R’s power she will begin to melt and unlearn much of her Lowood reserve.
Jane’s unconventional behaviour
“When you came on me in Hay Lane last night, I thought unaccountably of fairy tales”
Blanche Ingram
“You should hear mama on the chapter of governesses; Mary and I have had… a dozen at least on one day; half of them detestable and the rest ridiculous, and all incubi”
Jane paints a self-portrait named
“Portrait of a Governess, disconnected, poor, and plain.”
Janes self-assured pleasure at
“Vexing and sooting him” (rochester)
Jane is hard on herself
“dupe” ; “blind puppy”
Rochesters hesitation
“Good-night, my -“
Janes strength
“I desired liberty; for liberty I gasped; for liberty I uttered a prayer”
Jane is convinced that R will marry Blanche Ingram for
“rank and connections”
Old gypsy woman
“the gentry their fortunes”
Bessies observation
“You are genteel enough; you look like a lady, and it is as much I ever expected of you: you were no beauty as a child.”
Thornfield
“array of mighty old thorn trees, strong, knotty, and broad as oaks”
Jane becomes a governess
“Inexperienced youth” ; “A new chapter in a novel”
When R + J meet he says
“necessity compels me to make you useful”
Fire and Ice
Thornfield is ice before R returns and Jane says she is “becoming incapable of appreciating” the “very privileges of security and ease” – Under R’s power she will begin to melt and unlearn much of her Lowood reserve.
Jane’s unconventional behaviour
“When you came on me in Hay Lane last night, I thought unaccountably of fairy tales”
Adele
“You should hear mama on the chapter of governesses; Mary and I have had… a dozen at least on one day; half of them detestable and the rest ridiculous, and all incubi”
Jane paints a self-portrait named
“Portrait of a Governess, disconnected, poor, and plain.”
Janes self-assured pleasure at
“Vexing and sooting him” (rochester)
Jane is hard on herself
“dupe” ; “blind puppy”
Rochesters hesitation
“Good-night, my -“
Jane is convinced that R will marry Blanche Ingram for
“rank and connections”
Helen to Jane
“You think too much of the love of human beings.”
Jane to Helen
“I’ll stay with you, dear Helen: no one shall take me away.”
Jane about Ingram and Rochester
“I saw all his attentions appropriated by a great lady, who scorned to touch me with the hem of her robes as she passed.”
Jane about Rochester request for her to be his mistress
“If I lived with you as you desire, I should then be your mistress: to say otherwise is sophistical – is false.”
Jane
“I care for myself. The more solitary, the more friendless, the more sustained I am, the more I will respect myself.”
Jane to Rochester about Ingram
“Why did you take such pains to make me believe you wished to marry Miss Ingram?”
Jane about leaving thornfield
“I must part with you for my whole life: I must begin a new existence among strange faces and strange scene.”
Brocklehurst
“…you must shun her example; if necessary, avoid her company, exclude her from your games…”
Brocklehurst
“Punish her body to save her soul.” – comes from ‘beware those who mutilate the flesh’
Brocklehurst
“Naturally! Yes, but we are not to conform to nature… Miss Temple that girl’s hair must be cut of entirely.”
St. John
“I feel I can easily and naturally make room in my heart for you, as my third and youngest sister.”
Brocklehurst
“Starve their immortal souls.”
Brocklehurst quotes the bible
“If ye suffer hunger or thirst for my sake, happy are ye.”
Jane about Helen
“… She breathed a little fast and coughed a short cough, I momentarily forgot my own sorrows to yield to a vague concern for her.”
Jane about miss temple
“Miss temple embraced us both, saying, as she drew us to her heart – ‘God bless you, my child.’
Miss Temple
“How are you tonight, Helen? Have you coughed much today?”
Diana
“St. John! you used to call Jane your third sister…”
Rochester about Bertha
“When I left college, I was sent out to Jamaica, to espouse a bride already courted for me.”
Rochester about Adeles mom
“A French dancer’s bastard?”
Aunt Reed
“Take her away to the red-room, and lock her in there.”
Aunt Reed to Brocklehurst
“… guard her against her worst fault, a tendency to deceit.”
Jane about Aunt Reed
“It was her nature to wound me cruelty.”
Jane about Rochester
“And was Mr. Rochester now ugly in my eyes? No, reader: gratitude and many associates, all pleasurable and genial, made his face the object I best liked to see; presence in a room was more cheering than the brightest fire.”
Jane about Rochester
“…he is not of their kind. I believe he is of mine.”
Jane about Rochester
“I have something in my brain and heart, in my blood and nerves, that assimilates me mentally to him.”
Rochester
“I knew… you would do me good in some way, at some time; – I saw it in your eyes when I first beheld you…”
Jane
“The ease of his manner frees me from painful restraint; the friendly frankness, as correct as cordial, with which he treated me, drew me to him.”
Jane to Rochester
“All my heart is yours sir: it belongs to you…”
Rochester to Jane
“I have for the first time found what I can truly love – I have found you. You are sympathy – my better self – my good angel…. powerful flame, fuses you and me in one.”
Rochester to Jane
“I ask you to pass through life at my side – to be my second self, and best earthly companion.”
Rochester
“My very soul demands you.”
Rochester to Jane
“Every atom of your flesh is as dear to me as my own: in pain and sickness it would still be dear.”
Ch 37
“Jealousy had got hold of him: she stung him but the sting was salutary: it gave him respite from the gnawing fang of melancholy. I would not, therefore, immediately charm the snake.”
Ch 37 proposal
“Jane, will you marry me?”
“Yes sir.”
“A cripples man, twenty years older than you, whom you will have to wait on?”
“Yes, sir.”
“Truly, Jane.”
“Most truly, sir.”
Ch 37 – Rochester description
“Wronged and fettered bird”
“Caged eagle”
“Raven black”
Ch 32 ; 32
“He would of loved me for a while.”
Ch 33 ; 34
“It was a grand boom doubtless and independence would be glorious.”
Ch 33 ; 34
“Glorious discovery to a lonely wretch.”
Ch 33 ; 34
“Never shall marry.”
Ch 25 ; 26
“You, sir are the most phantom-like of all you are a mere dream.”
Ch 25 ; 26
“Jane! Will you hear reason?”(he stooped and approached his lips to my ear) “because, if you won’t, I’ll try violence.”
Ch 25 ; 26
“My hopes were all dead – struck with a subtle doom.”
Ch 25 ; 26
“Jane Eyre… was a solitary girl again: her life pale; her prospects were desolate.”
Ch 25 ; 26
“…for my low-born head, and ask if that was it good enough for a woman who could bring her husband neither fortune, beauty, nor connections.”
Ch 25 ; 26
“I feared my hopes were too bright to be realised; and I had enjoyed so much bliss lately that I imagined my fortune had passed it’s meridian, and must now decline.”
Ch 25 ; 26
“Mr Rochester was not to me what he had been; for he was no what I had though him.”
Ch 23
“Burning with the light of red jewel and furnace flame.”
Ch 23
“…the thunder crashed, fierce and frequent as the lightning gleamed.”
Ch 23
“I was safe and tranquil.”
Ch 24
“Jewels for Jane eyre sounds unnatural and strange: I would rather not have them.”
Ch 24
“I persuaded him to make an exchange in favour of a sober black satin and pearl-grey silk.”
Ch 21
“…to freak if children was a sure sign of trouble, either to one’s self or one’s kin.”
Ch 21
“Promise me only to stay a week..”
“You have as good as informed me, sir, that you are going shortly to be married?”
Ch 21
“I declined accepting more than was my due.”
Ch 21
“…the grate and fire-irons were burnished bright, and the fire burnt clear.”
Ch 21 about beasie
“She wanted to know if I was happy at Thornfield Hall..”
Ch 21
“I approached my cheek to her lips: she would not touch it.”
Ch 21
“Well, I have twice done you a wrong which I regret now.”
Ch 22 Eliza about Georgiana
“…so I bore with her feeble-minded wailings and selfish Lamentations as well as I could.”
Ch 22 Eliza to jane
“You perform your won part in life and burden no one.”
Ch 21 Eliza to georgiana
“You had no right to be born, for you make no use of life.”
Ch 21 Georgiana to eliza
“Everyone knows you are the most selfish, heartless creature in existence: and I know your spiteful hatred towards me.”
Ch 22
“I half ventured to hope that he would, even after his marriage, keep us together somewhere under the shelter of his protection.”
Ch22
“You must see the carriage, Jane, and tell me if you don’t think it will suit mrs Rochester exactly; and whether she won’t look like queen Boadicea.”
Ch 22
“Thank you, me Rochester, for your great kindness. I am strangely glad to get back again to you: and wherever you are is my home – my only home.”
Ch22
“Absent from me a whole month, and forgetting me quite, I’ll be sworn!”
Ch22 Jane imagines people at thornfield saying
“Hasten! Hasten! Be with him while you may: but a few more days or weeks, at most, and you are parted from him for ever!”
Ch22 romantic setting
“How full the hedges are of roses.”
Ch22
“Never had he called me more frequently to his presence; never been kinder to me when there-and alas! Never has I loved him so well.”
Ch19
“The flame flickers in the eye: the eye shines like dew; it looks soft and full of feeling; it smiles at my jargon; it is susceptible; impression follows impression through it’s clear sphere; where it ceases to smile.”
Ch 19
“Delights as times in laughter.”
Ch 19
“The passions may rage furiously, like true heathens.”
Ch20
“My little friend.”
Ch20
“Flowers in the garden awake and expand.”
Ch20
“You have notices my tender perchant to miss Ingram.”
Ch17
“My eyes were involuntarily drawn to his face; I could not keep their lids under control.”
Ch17
“He made me love him without looking at me.”
Ch18
“I must smother hope. I must remember that he cannot care much for me.”
Ch18
“Good-night my-” He stopped, bit his lip and abruptly left me.”
Ch17
“…feel a strange chill fainting of the heart.”
Ch17
“you have nothing to do with the master of thornfield.”
Ch17
“Vague suggestions kept wandering across my brain of reasons why I should quit thornfield.”
Ch17
“…screened by the curtain, I could see without being seen.”
Ch 14
“You examine me, Miss Eyre,” “do you think me handsome?”
Ch14
“Which had been lit for dinner, filled the room with a fractal breath of light; the large fire was all red and clear; the purple curtains him rich and ample before the lofty window and loftier arch; everything was still… and filling up each pause, the beating of winter rain against the panes.”
Ch15 Rochester about Adele
“Adele, who, she affirmed, was my daughter; and perhaps she may be, though I see no proofs of such grim paternity written in her countenance: pilot is more like me than she. Some years after I had broken with the mother, she abandoned her child, and ran away to Italy with musician or singer.”
Ch15 Jane about adele
“No: Adele is not answerable for either her mother’s faults or yours: I have a regard for her; and now that I know she is, in a sense, parentless – forsaken by her mother and disowned by you, sir.”
Ch15
“Strange energy was in his voice, strange fire in his look.”
Ch9
“Her grave is in Brocklebridge churchyard: for fifteen years after her death it was only concerned by a grassy mound; but now now a grey marble tablet marks the spot, inscribed with her name, and the word “Resurgam.””
Ch9 helen
“God is my father; God is my friend: I love him; I believe he loves me.”
Ch9 Jane about helen
“Nor ever ceased to cherish for her a sentiment of attachment, as strong, tender, and respectful as any that ever animated my heart.”
Ch10
“The school, thus improved, became in time a truly useful and novel institution.”
Ch10
“She has stood me in the stead of mother, governess and latterly, companion.”
Ch 6,7,8 Jane about helen
“Her soul sat in her lips and language flowered.”
Ch4 &5 Jane argues with her aunt
“I am not deceitful.”
Ch2
Jane describes herself as “rebel slave”
Ch11 mrs fairfax
“I am so glad you are come; it will be quite pleasant living here now with a companion.”

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