the tragedy of julius caesar unit review Flashcard Example #26181

Read the excerpt below from act 5.1 of The Tragedy of Julius Caesar and answer the question that follows.

CASSIUS:
Messala,
This is my birthday . . . .
Now I change my mind,
And partly credit things that do presage. . . .
Two mighty eagles fell . . . .
And in their steads do ravens, crows, and kites
Fly o’er our heads and downward look on us,
As we are sickly prey. Their shadows seem
A canopy most fatal under which
Our army lies, ready to give up the ghost.

How does Cassius’ use of figurative language in the bolded lines foreshadow the possible fate of his and Brutus’ army?

Responses may vary but should include some or all of the following information:

By using figurative language, Shakespeare creates a visual image of Octavius’ army overtaking them like inescapable death. Cassius’ words foreshadow later events in act 5.

Which quotation from act 1.3 in The Tragedy of Julius Caesar is the best example of foreshadowing?
CASSIUS:
That heaven hath infused them with these spirits
To make them instruments of fear and warning
Unto some monstrous state.
How does The Tragedy of Julius Caesar explore the theme of betrayal?
As the tragic figure in the play, Brutus’ involvement in Caesar’s assassination, in which Brutus murders his friend, eventually leads to his downfall.
Which paragraph summarizes Julius Caesar’s life best?
Julius Caesar was born into a powerful family. He became a successful military general and politician, eventually becoming dictator of Rome. He was assassinated in 44 BCE
Standing in the toy store, Holly spotted a vintage Barbie and had a memory of playing with her best friend in her basement. The __________ was so true-to-life, she thought she was eight years old again.
flashback
What is the difference between a major and a minor character?
A major character plays a big role in the plot, while a minor character has a less important story line.
Read the excerpt below from act 3.2 of The Tragedy of Julius Caesar and answer the question that follows.

ANTONY:
If you have tears, prepare to shed them now.
You all do know this mantle1. I remember
The first time ever Caesar put it on.
‘Twas on a summer’s evening in his tent,
That day he overcame the Nervii2.
Look, in this place ran Cassius’ dagger through.
See what a rent the envious Casca made.
Through this the well-beloved Brutus stabbed;

1. A cloak.
2. One of Caesar’s military conquests.

Which rhetorical appeal does Mark Antony use in the above excerpt?

Mark Antony uses an appeal to pathos by first recalling the memory of Caesar’s military success and then showing his body stabbed by the conspirators
Read the excerpt below from act 5.1 of The Tragedy of Julius Caesar and answer the question that follows.

BRUTUS:
No, Cassius, no.
Think not, thou noble Roman,
That ever Brutus will go bound to Rome.
He bears too great a mind. But this same day
Must end that work the ides of March begun;
And whether we shall meet again I know not.
Therefore our everlasting farewell take.
For ever and for ever farewell, Cassius.
If we do meet again, why, we shall smile.
If not, why then, this parting was well made.

CASSIUS:
For ever and for ever farewell, Brutus.
If we do meet again, we’ll smile indeed.
If not, ’tis true this parting was well made.

Which theme do Brutus and Cassius explore in saying farewell to each other before they begin the battle with Octavius’ army?

honor and friendship
How does Shakespeare use language and dialogue to create a sense of anxiety and frenzy among the conspirators just before the assassination?
The conspirators exchange short bursts of one-syllable words, which shows their urgency and fear that the assassination might not succeed.
Which statement about tragedy is true?
Tragedy exposes negative emotions and fears.
Which social change did Caesar not put into place?
Senate benefits
Julius Caesar and Queen Elizabeth I were often considered __________, leaders who worked to seize absolute power.
tyrants
“Denouement” is another word for the __________ of a plot.
resolution
Read the excerpt below from act 5.1 of The Tragedy of Julius Caesar and answer the question that follows.

BRUTUS:
No, Cassius, no.
Think not, thou noble Roman,
That ever Brutus will go bound to Rome.
He bears too great a mind. But this same day
Must end that work the ides of March begun;
And whether we shall meet again I know not.
Therefore our everlasting farewell take.
For ever and for ever farewell, Cassius.
If we do meet again, why, we shall smile.
If not, why then, this parting was well made.

CASSIUS:
For ever and for ever farewell, Brutus.
If we do meet again, we’ll smile indeed.
If not, ’tis true this parting was well made.

What is the tone of this exchange between Brutus and Cassius? Give specific examples of words that support your answer.

Responses may vary but should include some or all of the following information:

Students may identify the tone as any of the following choices: sincere, serious, honest, stoic. Example:

The tone of this exchange is sincere. These two friends face the potentiality of their deaths, acknowledge it, and say goodbye. Brutus’ sincerity is shown in his use of these words: “everlasting farewell take/For ever and for ever farewell, Cassius./If we do meet again, why, we shall smile.” Cassius echoes his words: “For ever and for ever farewell, Brutus./If we do meet again, we’ll smile indeed.”

Read the scenario below and answer the question that follows.

During a play, Emily needs to convey her innermost thoughts about her deep love for Richard. She moves to her bedroom on the stage, away from the ears of other characters. The audience listens as she begins to express her emotions in a speech.

Which type of speech fits this scenario best?

soliloquy

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