Tragedy and Drama Unit Test 96% Flashcard Example #53924

In Act V, scene iii of Romeo and Juliet, how does Romeo react when he hears someone in Juliet’s tomb?
He begs the intruder to leave.
In Act II, scene v of Romeo and Juliet, the nurse returns to Juliet with news from Romeo. Which emotion motivated the nurse to go on this quest for Juliet in the first place?
love
Read the passage from Romeo and Juliet, Act I, Scene v.

Benvolio: Away, be gone; the sport is at the best.

Now read the adaptation.

Benvolio: Let’s go; the best part of the party is over.

A modern audience might prefer the adaptation because it

updates the language.
Read the excerpt from Act V, scene iii of Romeo and Juliet.

Prince: A glooming peace this morning with it brings;
The sun, for sorrow, will not show his head:
Go hence, to have more talk of these sad things:
Some shall be pardon’d, and some punished:
For never was a story of more woe
Than this of Juliet and her Romeo.

Which words best help the reader understand the tone of the play’s conclusion? Check all that apply.

sad
woe
glooming
sorrow
Read the excerpt from Act V, scene iii of Romeo and Juliet.

Montague: Alas! my liege, my wife is dead to-night;
Grief of my son’s exile hath stopp’d her breath.
What further woe conspires against mine age?

What is the best paraphrase of the underlined text?

What other pain must I suffer through as I get older?
Read Friar Laurence’s dialogue from Act V, scene iii of Romeo and Juliet.

But he which bore my letter, Friar John,
Was stay’d by accident, and yesternight
Return’d my letter back.

Based on these lines, what role did Friar John play in the catastrophe?

He was prevented from delivering Friar Laurence’s letter.
Read the excerpt from Act V, scene iii of Romeo and Juliet.

Friar Laurence: Stay not to question, for the watch is coming;
Come, go, good Juliet.—Noise again. I dare no longer stay.

Juliet: Go, get thee hence, for I will not away. Exit FRIAR LAURENCE.
What’s here? a cup, clos’d in my true love’s hand?
Poison, I see, hath been his timeless end.
O churl! drunk all, and left no friendly drop
To help me after! I will kiss thy lips;
Haply, some poison yet doth hang on them,
To make me die with a restorative. Kisses him.
Thy lips are warm!

First Watch: Within. Lead, boy: which way?

Juliet: Yea, noise? then I’ll be brief. O happy dagger! Snatching ROMEO’S dagger.

Which phrases

happy dagger
timeless end
Which element of a Shakespearean tragedy does Romeo represent in Act V, scene iii of Romeo and Juliet?
a flawed hero
Which is an example of dramatic irony in Act V, scene iii of Romeo and Juliet?
Romeo thought Juliet was dead when he poisoned himself, but the audience knew she was alive.
Which excerpt from Act V, scene iii of Romeo and Juliet best reflects the play’s overall theme?
Prince: See what a scourge is laid upon your hate,
That heaven finds means to kill your joys with love;
Read the excerpt from Act I, scene i of Romeo and Juliet.

If ever you disturb our streets again
Your lives shall pay the forfeit of the peace.

What event is foreshadowed by the Prince’s words?

Romeo and Juliet’s tragic deaths
Read the excerpt from Act I, scene i of Romeo and Juliet.

Tybalt: What! art thou drawn among these heartless hinds?
Turn thee, Benvolio, look upon thy death.

Benvolio: I do but keep the peace: put up thy sword,
Or manage it to part these men with me.

Tybalt: What! drawn, and talk of peace? I hate the word,
As I hate hell, all Montagues, and thee.
Have at thee, coward! They fight.

Based on this dialogue, which word best describes Tybalt?

aggressive
Read the excerpt from Act I, scene I of Romeo and Juliet.

Romeo: Well, in that hit you miss: she’ll not be hit
With Cupid’s arrow; she hath Dian’s wit;
And, in strong proof of chastity well arm’d,
From love’s weak childish bow she lives unharm’d.
She will not stay the siege of loving terms,

Which is the best meaning of the phrase “she’ll not be hit with Cupid’s arrow”?

She does not want to fall in love with anyone.
Read the excerpt from Act I, scene i of Romeo and Juliet.

Capulet: What noise is this? Give me my long sword, ho!
Lady Capulet: A crutch, a crutch! Why call you for a sword?
Capulet: My sword, I say! Old Montague is come,
And flourishes his blade in spite of me.

What is the purpose of this dialogue?

to provide comic relief
In Act I, scene i of Romeo and Juliet, the character of Benvolio embodies the archetype of the
loyal friend
Read the excerpt from Act I, scene i of Romeo and Juliet.

Romeo: Well, in that hit you miss: she’ll not be hit
With Cupid’s arrow; she hath Dian’s wit;
And, in strong proof of chastity well arm’d,
From love’s weak childish bow she lives unharm’d.

The fact that this dialogue contains elements of a Shakespearean sonnet emphasizes Romeo’s

longing for the woman he is describing.
Read the excerpt from Act I, scene i of Romeo and Juliet.

Yet tell me not, for I have heard it all.
Here’s much to do with hate, but more with love:
Why then, O brawling love! O loving hate!
O any thing! of nothing first create.
O heavy lightness! serious vanity!
Mis-shapen chaos of well-seeming forms!
Feather of lead, bright smoke, cold fire, sick health!
Still-waking sleep, that is not what it is!
This love feel I, that feel no love in this.
Dost thou not laugh?

The oxymorons in Romeo’s dialogue emphasize

the extreme emotions that he is feeling.
What is the purpose of the prologue of Romeo and Juliet? Check all that apply.
to introduce the audience to important characters
to inform the audience where the story takes place
to lay out specific details about different plot points
Read the excerpt from Act IV, scene iv of Romeo and Juliet.

Nurse: O woe! O woeful, woeful, woeful day!
Most lamentable day, most woeful day,
That ever, ever, I did yet behold!
O day! O day! O day! O hateful day!
Never was seen so black a day as this:
O woeful day, O woeful day!

These lines help the reader better understand Nurse’s

love and affection for Juliet.
Read Capulet’s lines directed at Nurse from Act IV, scene iv of Romeo and Juliet.

Go waken Juliet, go and trim her up;
I’ll go and chat with Paris. Hie, make haste,
Make haste; the bridegroom he is come already:
Make haste, I say. Exeunt.

Which phrase best restates “make haste”?

hurry up
Read Juliet’s dialogue from Act IV, scene iii of Romeo and Juliet.

Or, if I live, is it not very like,
The horrible conceit of death and night,
Together with the terror of the place,
As in a vault, an ancient receptacle,
Where, for these many hundred years, the bones
Of all my buried ancestors are pack’d;

In this excerpt, the motif of night emphasizes Juliet’s fear that

she will never wake up.
Which best describes is the primary conflict of Act IV, scenes iii-v of Romeo and Juliet?
Juliet fakes her own death using poison.
Read the excerpt from Act IV, scene v of Romeo and Juliet.

Paris: Have I thought long to see this morning’s face,
And doth it give me such a sight as this?

Which best describes Paris’s reaction when he believes that Juliet has died?

He’s devastated that he cannot marry her.
How do Juliet’s parents contribute to the catastrophe in Act IV, scenes iii-v of Romeo and Juliet?
by pushing Juliet into a quick marriage with Paris
Read the excerpt from Juliet’s soliloquy in Act IV, scene iii of Romeo and Juliet.

What if this mixture do not work at all?
Shall I be married then to-morrow morning?
No, no; this shall forbid it: lie thou there. Laying down a dagger.
What if it be a poison, which the friar
Subtly hath minister’d to have me dead,
Lest in this marriage he should be dishonour’d
Because he married me before to Romeo?
I fear it is: and yet, methinks, it should not,
For he hath still been tried a holy man.
I will not entertain so bad a thought.

The purpose of this soliloquy is to help the audience understand

Juliet’s uneasiness about going through with her plan.

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